Can the Cleaning Industry Turn to Green Industry?

Can the Cleaning Industry Turn to Green Industry?

Can the cleaning industry really become a more environmentally friendly industry and remain at the forefront of the “green” revolution? Or is it already there? The answer lay somewhere in between, if the truth is told.

There have been huge inroads within the cleaning industry to making its products and services greener and environment friendly. This is a costly and daunting job, given the size of the cleaning industry. However, it is a necessary one and companies that do not produce or use enough eco-friendly products, will eventually fall by the wayside in comparison to those who have invested their energies into manufacturing or using greener, safer products.

The big debate though, isn’t whether the cleaning industry is on the right path, but whether these green products are as effective and cost efficient as the older, perhaps less eco-friendly ones. This very issue is where most of the time and effort has been expended by the large cleaning companies. To have a greener product is one thing. But if the results you get with that product are less effective and more costly, such as deep cleaning, then its popularity will be compromised. The public will still only go so far when offered greener products. They also want to see results too, and only then will they spend their money.

The case for greener cleaning products could not be stronger. Everyone affected is safer as a result: the person using the product, the inhabitants of the surrounding area and the environment as a whole. Such is the increases of technology and money invested in this area of the industry that there are green products out there on the market which outstrip more traditional cleaning products in terms of performance. Maybe twenty or thirty years ago, this would not have been the case, but gradually in time, the eco-friendly versions have caught up and can now be seen as a direct competitor to the less greener alternatives.

This is all well and good, but the problems start to arise when established restoration technicians and traditional project cleaners prefer to use the products that they know. There is an element that believes green products cannot handle the more heavy duty deep cleaning and so is tackled with the more traditional, but less healthy options. This is a common misconception, particularly within the restoration segment of the cleaning industry, where products need to be strong as a necessity. This is a mind-set that will take time to filter down through the entire cleaning industry, and hopefully will supersede the more traditional products.

Leave a Reply